Removal Company House Move Acle NR13

For house moves that need a trusted removal firm in Acle NR13 and the surrounding areas look no further than the Transporter Norwich. we specialise in moving houses locally or nationwide.

We don’t just have moving vans, we are proficient in home furniture removal able to take apart and put back together wardrobes, tables, units, cabinets and sofas. we can also take down shelves, pictures and tv wall brackets and put them up again.

Heavy items are no problem, all our staff are gym trained and ready to lift anything you need moving, without scraping walls or door frames. So no need to hire a van and struggle wen we can take the stress out of your moving day.

We can recommend the best local storage company units and help you get the most out of them with our tetris superpowers 😉

Compare removal companies in acle, you will find us to be the most trusted, reliable and fair priced.

In Roman times, Acle was a port at the head of a large estuary named Gariensis. Acle is mentioned in the Domesday Book, and in 1253 it was granted a market charter. The livestock and local farmers’ market persisted into the 1970s, as did a nearby auction site; the latter is now a new housing estate and the former is part-occupied by a branch of Budgens, with the other part remaining a market, although essentially for tourist purposes: no livestock is now bought or sold there.

In 1382, Acle received the right for a “turbary“, that is, the right to dig peat. Acle still has a boatyard and Boat Dyke and walks along the Bure to Upton and beyond are possible.

The Acle Straight is a turnpike road connecting Acle to Great Yarmouth. It opened in 1831.[4] Acle railway station, which was built in 1883, lies on the Wherry Line from Norwich to Great Yarmouth. In 1892 a foundry was constructed that specialised in building windpumps for land drainage, including the very last windpump built for the Broads, at Ash Tree Farm. The three-mile (5 km) £7.1m dual-carriageway A47 bypass opened in March 1989; local campaigners are still pressing for the dualling of the Acle Straight, the portion of the A47 running from Acle to Great Yarmouth, which has a relatively high accident rate.

Since the turn of the century, a walkway running from the station to the Boat Dyke has been constructed by local volunteers; this walk (known as Damgate) offers an opportunity to view indigenous flora, some of which are rare. Also on the Damgate walk, there have been repeated sightings of a kingfisher, locally known as Henry, which is said to fly under the abandoned railway bridge around mid afternoon.

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